Posts Tagged ‘character development’

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Character Lessons From an Innkeeper

October 4, 2016

Someone I knew, although not all that well, died recently. In total, I had no more than a dozen conversations with Richard, but his words, his presence, and his energy influenced me. A loss is hard enough when you know someone well, but when you lose someone who plays a small but impactful role in your life, it can be confusing and certainly jarring.

When I heard Richard had died, I was sad; sad for him, his family, and his friends. I was sad for the small hole in my life but also sad for other strangers, who’d known him only marginally, but would miss his presence.

Richard worked at an old mountain inn, which was almost always empty and not at all fancy. I went there to write because the town was quiet, I knew no one, and could get a lot of work done in a short period of time. I had no distractions, except one: Richard.

Sometimes I’d arrive at the hotel last minute, because it wasn’t the kind of place one needed a reservation. Richard would wave his hands in the air, greeting me like a long-lost celebrity. He liked to talk, but I had deadlines and work to get done. Eventually, I learned to plan intentional evening writing breaks to listen to Richard’s stories. I never regretted it.

At first, Richard’s tall tales made me scratch my head. Were they really true? But as I got to know him, I realized they were. Richard lived in the middle of nowhere, but he’d been places. As he poked the logs crackling in the fireplace, he’d tell me about his mother, growing up on a farm, and picking apples. He shared incredible adventures about his time in the military. He told me about quinoa growth in South America and the complicated legalities of water rights. He was a lobbyist with a strong political bent. Richard was not a gossip but knew everyone in town and beyond.

Once, I sat silently as Richard spent an hour arguing with an older man who had opposing political views. They remained civil, agreeing to disagree. Later, I mentioned how it was nice, rare these days, but nice they respected each other’s views. Richard answered in his usual, enthusiastic voice, “Why get angry when someone disagrees with you? If we all thought the same way, life would be big time boring.” He was right, of course. If we all had the same politics, the same religion, and the same interests, life would be ‘big time boring.’

From what I gathered, Richard’s time was anything but boring, but I didn’t realize how significantly his stories made me think about life. Every time I left town, a piece of him found its way into my writing and into my world. Not only did Richard help me realize the importance of taking time to talk and cultivate unforeseen relationships, but he also taught me something about character development; a necessary piece of writing.

As a fiction writer, I use a variety of tools to create believable characters. The enneagram, character sketches, psychology tests, and archetypal profiles all help me build the people in my manuscripts. There are times I want to cheat and make it easier for myself by not doing the needed work to deepen a character. But when I do, the characters fall flat. By living his life fully and deeply, Richard reminded me to make characters complex, rich with detail, and unexpected. A complex character can make or break a story. I think Richard felt that way about life—you make it or break it by the kind of world you build.

I’ll miss Richard, but I don’t regret the time I took to ask a few questions and listen to his stories. He lived a large life. So should we all.

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Character Sketch 103

November 30, 2012

Tips to Know your Character

-Download a character sketch

-Interview your character

-Create questions/details not included in your character sketch and answer them (what’s their favorite ice-cream, what did they have for breakfast)

-Write a letter to your character

-Pretend you are the character and write your resume

-Pretend you are the character and write a letter to your mom

-Pretend you are the character and write a letter to your girlfriend/boyfriend

-If your character could invent something, what would it be?

-Who would your character want to meet (one living and one dead person)

-Jot details that you know but the reader might not

 

Make your character unique!

 

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Character Sketch 102

November 18, 2012

Last blog I provided a character sketch to help you develop your characters. This time, I’m putting a different spin on it. Besides the basics, like what a person is wearing or where they live, most character sketches ask questions about what a character likes, wants, and hopes. In this character sketch, think dark. What would your character never do? Then, think about what would happen if they did it. Right there, you have yourself a scene full of emotion and tension.

Here’s a start…

Where would your character refuse to live?

What would your character never eat?

What would they never wear?

What political party would they not support?

What magazine would they not pick up at the airport?

What kind of doctor would they refuse to see?

What ride at an amusement park would they not get on?

How would they react if they did any of these things? Ready, set, write!

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Character Sketch 101

November 8, 2012

From time to time, I blog about character development. I believe it is so crucial to writing, that I’m devoting the next three blogs to help create interesting characters.

Details about a character are important. Sometimes, authors get stuck. It can be a challenge developing details that don’t have to do with clothing and hair color. Character sketches provide questions to help writers think deeply about their darlings.

Below is one of my character sketches, but don’t limit yourself. Google a few more options and really think about what makes your characters tick. Remember, not all of it needs to be added to your work. As long as you know your character inside and out, that’s all that matters.

Character Sketch 

Carrie Brown-Wolf

carrie@carriebrownwolf.com

Name:

Age:

Gender:

Siblings:

Parents:

Children:

Pets:

Married? To Whom?

Ethnicity?

Religion?

Where do they live?

Favorite:

-color

-ice-cream

-breakfast

-person

-animal

-number

-state

-sport

-flavor of toothpaste

-soup

-ride at an amusement park

-candy

-room

What makes them sad?

What can make them angry?

What emotion do they almost never show? Why?

What scares them?