Archive for the ‘prejudice’ Category

h1

Emerging Beauty: Find beauty in your world. It’s there.

March 19, 2020

5616

Last fall, my daughter, Ellie, taught English in Colombia. As an 80’s girl, my vision of Colombia was one of cocaine, violence, and death, so her going made me nervous. But when she called from Medellin to tell me the city was full of art and beauty, I tripped over my disparaging prejudice. The city, which had been ravaged during the 80’s drug war, has become a place of emerging beauty.

Emerging Beauty.

Out of chaos, tragedy, and pain; beauty, love, and creativity transpire just as sure as a flower rising from the dirt. The Coronavirus has spun the world into uncharted, frightening territory. It is surreal, and yet, far too real. As we face the unknown, I’m transforming this blog into a place of discovery, hoping beauty will emerge.

Lately, my social media feed has exploded with frightening statistics and harrowing tales. But beauty has surfaced with good people offering good things. My intention is to cultivate and provide resources, so people can find sparks of positivity and pass it forward.

Day 1:

Today’s beauty is a simple quote by a 13-year-old girl who was ‘quarantined’ for two years.

“I don’t think of all the misery but of the beauty that still remains.”

– Anne Frank 

Stay well. Find emerging beauty.

Carrie

If you have links or ideas to share, please add them in the comments below.

Photo from: https://www.theguardian.com/artanddesign/gallery/2017/nov/21/street-art-in-medellin-colombia-in-pictures

 

h1

Road Trip Stories in the South

April 8, 2019

IMG_5511.jpeg

Last week, I had a most excellent adventure. First, I met my oldest and closest friends in New Orleans and then road-tripped with my 88-year-old mom through the South. Both pieces were extraordinary.

My friends never disappoint. Sure, we’ve grown older; our legs more tired and our wrinkles much deeper. We’ve raised kids and dogs and worked and suffered. We’ve become strong, independent women who know a thing or two, and yet, have plenty to learn. We’re a complicated crew. Because of my gals, I’ve learned that relationships take effort. I’ve also learned, the best ones are worth the investment.

As lives change, friendships shift; but once together, my friends and I remember. We remember big hair, Bon Jovi, shoulder pads, banana bike seats, pool parties, and Schaeffer Light. Now, we roll eyes, remembering the jocks and the burn-outs, the teachers and the coaches. We remember laughing. We remember predators. We remember love. Mostly, we remember our stories. Together; eating and drinking and dancing like fools, we make more moments to remember. Stories.

After my friends, dispersed, Mom arrived. Because her grandma was a suffragist and taught her to demand social justice, Mom taught me the same. We headed for Montgomery where much of our nation’s horrific history is recorded. We sat with ghosts. We studied at the Legacy Center, listening to stories of incarceration, injustice, lynching, and death. As white women raised in America, like it or not, we’ve benefited from slavery’s dark legacy and the Jim Crow laws that followed. After many museums, we sat with ourselves; sorry and ashamed. Mom and I had long talks about racism, social injustice, and the history that got us here. We committed ourselves to listen better. Act more. And to speak about what we learned; sharing both the stories that were told and the stories that disappeared.

By the end of my adventure, I realized, not for the first time, how quickly life moves; how tragic and joyful it can be. In the time we are given, relationships and stories transform life, making it either better or worse.

Stories.

For me, I hope to create a life where I live a good story, I write a good story, and I listen to all the stories I can.